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Georgia divorcees can avoid typical post-divorce family issues

Divorced parents may frequently struggle to adjust to separated life. Many overcompensate for the breakup, which can exacerbate children's separation anxiety, sense of instability and loneliness. Most parents can nip family issues in the bud by remembering one basic rule: the children's wellbeing comes first. Ex-spouses who share custody of their children may seek total control over their children's lives after the divorce, but this is not realistic. Two parents raising the same children may possess different opinions about childcare, and neither parent can expect to control how their ex-spouse raises the children during their parenting time.

According to Huffington Post, the best course of action is to avoid wheedling information from children about an ex-spouse's parenting style and to resist voicing negative comments. Additionally, calmly broaching disagreements directly with an ex-spouse can ensure that children do not bear the brunt of an angry parent's displeasure.

Another mistake frequently committed by divorced parents is becoming too clingy with their children. This behavior, such as pressuring children to spend all their time at parent-child bonding events, usually stems from loneliness or guilt. The key to proactively addressing this behavior is to find other outlets to vent any negative feelings that may be producing unusually clingy behavior, and then establish limits on communication frequency and family time so children can lead balanced lives.

A divorce specialist who may be able to finalize divorce proceedings quickly and fairly could give Georgia divorcees facing countless obstacles a much needed break from stress. Accepting the assistance of a lawyer experienced in fighting for child custody and alimony may sometimes give parents more time to focus on their children.

Source: Huffington Post, "Why Every Divorcing Parent Screws Up (and Why It's OK)", Kate Scharff, August 06, 2013